Lawyers

High profile lawyer Grant Cameron ordered to repay fee for poor service

Lawyer Grant Cameron partner and his firm GCA Lawyers have been ordered to repay a fee.

STACY SQUIRES./Stuff

Lawyer Grant Cameron partner and his firm GCA Lawyers have been ordered to repay a fee.

Prominent Christchurch lawyer Grant Cameron and his firm have been ordered to repay charges after failing to file documents in an earthquake claim case.

The Disputes Tribunal has ordered Cameron and GCA lawyers to pay $6000 to Bromley woman Mandy Fraser. The order comprised fees of $5,793 and $206 for stress and inconvenience.

It was made after a hearing Cameron did not attend. He told Stuff he was unaware of the tribunal’s decision but would be looking at an appeal.

Cameron is a class action specialist who has taken many high profile cases, including a class action against Southern Response.

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In a decision released in December, the tribunal said Fraser’s mother was involved in High Court proceedings over a claim relating to her house damaged in the Christchurch earthquakes.

Her mother died, and Fraser needed to be made a party to the proceedings.

Mandy Fraser claims her Bromley house, which has uneven floors, cracked foundations and bowed walls, was poorly repaired.

David Walker/Stuff

Mandy Fraser claims her Bromley house, which has uneven floors, cracked foundations and bowed walls, was poorly repaired.

She instructed GCA Lawyers in March 2018 and paid an up-front retainer of $3,000.

The law firm did not file the required papers by a deadline for a case management conference and Fraser was given 10 days to remedy the situation.

She hired new lawyers and got her file from GCA lawyers after paying more fees. Internal correspondence on the file showed the firm did not intend to place themselves on the record for her proceedings.

The tribunal’s referee described the failure as being of “substantial character”.

Fraser also requested an apology from Cameron but the referee said he had no power to order one to be made.

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